Arguing with an idiot

Arguing with an idiot is like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter how smart you are, or how good you are at chess, they’re still going to knock over all the pieces and poop on the board.

– Anonymous.

Arguing with an idiot is like playing chess with a pigeon - via pablo as jpg

 

45 Writing Tips

The wonderful Caitlin Lambert has written a post with 45 Writing Tips From Actual Writers. I am truly honoured that she’s chosen to include a writing tip that I suggested:

Try to write every day, even if it’s just for a minute. Next week, aim for five minutes, then ten, then fifteen. Good habits are difficult to get into but if you can write every day it will give you the best possible start.”

I’m somewhat embarrassed to say that I don’t always follow my own damn advice. Some days I just don’t get around to doing it, or I’m just not feeling that the muse has struck me (or is stood behind me with a mallet threatening me with a beating if I don’t hit that keyboard), even though in those moments I should write about what it’s like to not feel those itchy writing fingers. Mea culpa, dear reader; despite any rumours to the contrary, I’m only human. ;p

This is me after five minute with Gmail's new layout

Writer’s block, thy name is evil.

Haggis

Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o the puddin’-race!
Aboon them a’ ye tak your place,
Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye worthy o’ a grace
As lang’s my arm.

Address to a Haggis, verse 1, by Robert Burns.

Haggis is intimately associated with Scotland and Burns Night, which is held today, 25th March. Not by coincidence, this is Robert Burns’ birthday. So, in honour of my Scottish heritage and that fact that I love haggis, here’s a poll for you.

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Chaos Panic and Disorder

Chaos

Chaos, panic and disorder. My work here is done.

– Anon.

Well, the US is now in the hands of a leader not elected by the majority, with low approval ratings and an uncertain future. Oh hang on, that’s just like the UK… ><

“What is past is prologue.”

– William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 2, Scene I.

Robert Aitken’s sculpture “The Future,” at the National Archives building.

The words “What is past is prologue” are inscribed on Robert Aitken’s sculpture “The Future.” It sits at the northeast corner of the National Archives building.